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Traveling by air with 18650 batteries


#1

I will be flying on hols soon and want to take my new Wismec RX2/3 with spare batteries, never entered my mind as to whether you can take them on aircraft, They will be in my hand luggage so assuming they will be ok but need to know its ok as don’t them confiscating at security. It will be two in mod and 2 spares in a battery case.
Has anyone travelled on aircraft with them and been questioned or had them took off them ?
Thanks


#2

As far as i know the 18650s are OK because they are not LiPo. But check it out on the website of the airline, they usually have it listed if there is a problem.


#3

@gollum2016 I think you need to have all batteries in battery cases and none of them in the mod. All for security reasons.
Could be wrong here but if i were you i would check that out to be safe.


#4

I agree, that sounds most logical, I would put them in cases anyway and not have any in the mod just to be safe.


#5

Looked on line and found this info should anyone else be traveling it might be useful

Travel Tips Tuesday: Safely Packing Batteries for Your Trip

Batteries If you’re traveling on vacation this summer, you’ll most likely need to bring some batteries along, whether they’re for your camera, personal electronics or other battery-operated equipment. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has implemented safety guidelines for batteries being transported on airplanes designed to prevent fire-related incidents from occurring. TSA works closely with the FAA on potential aviation safety and security issues, and TSA security officers are trained to identify potential safety and security battery-related threats in carry-on and checked bags.

Here is the breakdown on what batteries are allowed and prohibited in carry-on and checked bags, along with some packing tips for safe travel with batteries:

Batteries Allowed in Carry-on Bags:

Dry cell alkaline batteries; typical AA, AAA, C, D, 9-volt, button sized cells, etc.
Dry cell rechargeable batteries such as Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH) and Nickel Cadmium (NiCad).
Lithium ion batteries (a.k.a.: rechargeable lithium, lithium polymer, LIPO, secondary lithium).
Consumer-sized lithium ion batteries [no more than 8 grams of equivalent lithium content or 100 watt hours (wh) per battery]. This size covers AA, AAA, 9-volt, cell phone, PDA, camera, camcorder, Gameboy, and standard laptop computer batteries.
Up to two larger lithium ion batteries (more than 8 grams, up to 25 grams of equivalent lithium content per battery) in their carry-on. This size covers larger extended-life laptop batteries. Most consumer lithium ion batteries are below this size.
Lithium metal batteries (a.k.a.: non-rechargeable lithium, primary lithium). These batteries are often used with cameras and other small personal electronics. Consumer-sized batteries (up to 2 grams of lithium per battery) may be carried. This includes all the typical non-rechargeable batteries for personal film cameras and digital cameras (AA, AAA, 123, CR123A, CR1, CR2, CRV3, CR22, 2CR5, etc.) as well as the flat round lithium button cells.

Batteries Allowed in Checked Bags:

Except for spare (uninstalled) lithium batteries, all the batteries allowed in carry-on baggage are also allowed in checked baggage; however, we recommend that you pack them in your carry-on bag whenever possible. In the cabin, airline flight crews can better monitor conditions, and have access to the batteries or device if a fire does occur.
Prohibited Batteries:

Car batteries, wet batteries, or spillable batteries are prohibited from both carry-on and checked baggage unless they are being used to power a scooter or wheelchair. If you need to pack a spare battery for a scooter or wheelchair, you must advise the aircraft operator so that the battery can be properly packaged for air travel.
Spare lithium batteries (both lithium metal and lithium ion/polymer) are prohibited in checked baggage.
Packing Tips for Batteries:

If you’re traveling with spare batteries in addition to the ones inside your devices, consider placing each battery in its own protective case, plastic bag, or package, or place tape across the battery’s contacts to isolate terminals. Isolating terminals prevents hazards due to short-circuiting.
If you must carry a battery-powered device in any baggage, please package it so it won’t accidentally turn on during the flight. If there is an on-off switch or a safety switch, tape it in the “off” position.
Check out the Department of Transportation’s spare battery tips page for more information on safely packing spare batteries, and this FAA webpage for more information on permitted and permitted batteries that includes helpful photos.
Battery Chargers:

You can pack battery chargers in carry-on and checked bags. If the charger has an electrical cord, be sure to wrap it tightly around the charger.
Don’t pack regular batteries in a rechargeable battery charger. Non-rechargeable batteries are not designed for recharging, and become hazardous if placed in a battery charger.

Safe travels!

Lynn


#6

I take it this part relates to the 18650 batteries
Not sure if the 18650 are above this size

Consumer-sized lithium ion batteries [no more than 8 grams of equivalent lithium content or 100 watt hours (wh) per battery]. This size covers AA, AAA, 9-volt, cell phone, PDA, camera, camcorder, Gameboy, and standard laptop computer batteries.
Up to two larger lithium ion batteries (more than 8 grams, up to 25 grams of equivalent lithium content per battery) in their carry-on. This size covers larger extended-life laptop batteries. Most consumer lithium ion batteries are below this size.

This is all info i can find from the Samsung ones i purchased

Type: Battery
Brand: SAMSUNG
Battery Type: Lithium-ion
Rechargeable: Yes
Protected: No
Voltage(V): 3.7V
Discharge Current: 30A
Mercury Free: Yes
Suitable for: MP4,MP3,Microphone,Flashlight,MP5,PDA,Digital Camera,CD Players,Car toys,Electronic Cigarette

Dimension and Weight
Product weight: 0.044 kg
Package weight: 0.240 kg
Product size (L x W x H): 6.50 x 1.80 x 1.80 cm / 2.56 x 0.71 x 0.71 inches
Package size (L x W x H): 8.00 x 5.00 x 5.00 cm / 3.15 x 1.97 x 1.97 inches


#7

[quote=gollum2016]I take it this part relates to the 18650 batteries
Not sure if the 18650 are above this size:

/airlines regulations quote:
Consumer-sized lithium ion batteries [no more than 8 grams of equivalent lithium content or 100 watt hours (wh) per battery][/quote]

You are safe in your assumption.

They are well under 100wh so you’re good!
They are rated in mah (milli-amp hours are smaller than Watt hours). The only thing you didn’t list in your specs. lol

Given that 18650 batteries are routinely flown over (which is why you sometimes see an elongated silver/white sticker on top of a battery, that sticker is required by regulations for air freight), the only thing that we as consumers have to worry about, is to make sure they go into your carry on baggage.

They cannot be in checked luggage.

EDIT: about the last line:
Obviously what they told me was BS then. Either that or the person just wanted to be a prick. It’s not like I was trying to take a slew of batteries with me. /sigh


#8

Being kinda sorta formally employed in the airline industry. (Changing jobs as we speak) Yes, carry on is ok. We prefer the batteries to be carried on and not checked below.

I have flown many times for personal and business. I’ve never had an issue. But as always if you go too far (like take more than what is needed for personal use like 20 batteries) the airline willl have an issue. You can be denied service by either tsa or the airline.

Just food for thought.


#9

I fly regularly with 18650s inside mods or in battery cases (simple plastic cases) in my hand luggage, and I’ve been checked and let through many times. They are used to vape gear by now.
The rules for liquids obviously apply to ejuice too, in hand baggage no larger than 100ml bottles all in a zip lock plastic bag (1 bag only).


#10

Thanks for info feel reassured now


#11

Very good stuff here … No mods on flights Seriously!?


#12

Great share! Thank you


#13

Here’s the official FAA document pertaining to the issue. You don’t have to pull the batteries from the mod (they shouldn’t force you to remove the battery from your laptop either), but in the end it’s up to a whim of TSA agent.

I’m a professional photographer, and fly all over the world with some serious lithium battery power in my carry-on bag. Never had an issue. Just make sure there are no loose batteries in your carry-on bag.