After taste in mouth and tongue

If i want make after taste for fruit recipe what i will add for the recipe?

What kindof after taste are you looking for?

If you are looking for a distinctively bad aftertaste, try adding fw cotton candy.

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I always add a floral like jasmine fa, honeysuckle tpa or ylang ylang fa

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I think what chris is asking , has more to do with how or what flavors come in best on the back end or exhale and leaves after taste… I have sort of been wondering the same thing since most of my recipes seem to have this same odd taste after the exhale.
I think mrneph2 is taking this in the right direction with perhaps a less desirable effect…

Too which I will add… perhaps up your flavor % in the mix. I have only been mixing myself for a couple weeks and I am no pro, but I feel like I initially was weak on flavoring and upon adding more I was getting slightly better taste on the exhale. Gummy candy is one I can say has done a little for me though.

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Hi Adham,

I’m attaching a picture that helped me understand certain things about mixing.

Let me use the example of Strawberry Cheesecake (a dessert) for an example.

Why is Strawberry Cheesecake itself delicious?

It’s delicious because it hits on all four flavor sensors on your tongue. It’s sweet, the crust is salty, and the berries are sour and a tiny bit bitter. When you take a bite of it you taste all of those things in a very balanced way and your brain says … “Ohhhhh Yummm I love that very much”.

When you mix, keep in mind balancing those things. Mix keeping in mind your perception of something delicious hits on all 4 of those sensors. (balanced of course)

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I find some fruits have no noticeable after taste, but there are a few that hang about for a bit.

Capellas Pomegranate. Anywhere from 0.5-3% in mixes, not tried a single flavour mix.
This one’s a bit unusual, it doesn’t really taste like pomegranate, it’s tastes… purple.
Like a deep plum, crossed with Parma Violets. If used wisely it can make an exceptional mix. I will warn you that it require an extra long steep, around 3-4 weeks to become nice and round/soft.

TFA’s Raspberry and Raspberry (sweet). Around 3 or 4%, if I recall, not too keen on these two. The flavour of straight Raspberry is really odd, very floral. My partner says it tastes how hand cream smells. But it leaves a pretty strong after taste and might be your thing. The sweet is a bit better and well, sweeter, with a similar flavour profile.

Last one that I can think of,

TFA’s Grape juice. At 5%, it’s the main note of your mix. I really really like this one. It’s a bit candy-like in the after glow, but with a more ‘real’ front note of grapey goodness. Goes really well with Apple Fuji or TFA’s Apple candy, as a fruit mix. And can also work well in smaller amounts in bakery and dessert mixes.

Also, have you tried adding some acid to the mix? I prefer Malic, but Citric works well too. In the short term it makes fruit flavour stand out more. You can get both, in solution, from tfa and capella.

Or you can make your own from the powders - i bought enough acids for about 3 lifetimes

Malic Acid 250g for $19.95 aud
Citric Acid 250g for $19.80 aud
Tartaric Acid 250g for $13.00 aud

If you are in AU

http://www.melbournefooddepot.com/?rf=kw&kw=Citric+Acid+250g

If not I am sure a bit of searching will get you acids much cheaper. I know it is a bit o/t but acids can help mixes tremendously

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And if you are in the UK, you can get citric acid crystals from most pharmacies, and malic acid crystals from confectioner supply shops. Using ~1 g per 10 ml of pg will give a ~10%solution.

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