ELR Home   Create recipe   Resource page   My recipes/favorites

Fav magnetic stirrer that doesn’t break the bank?

I bought a Benchmark Scientific BV101-GVornado Miniature Vortex and just don’t feel it stirs my eliquid. Anyone else use this? How long you hold your liquid on it to mix? Am I doing something wrong?

I was looking at some magnetic stirrers but don’t want to spend an absorbent amount of money on one nor anymore trial and error :woman_facepalming: So here’s to asking experts. What do you use, do you use a beaker on magnetic stirrers or can you fill a bottle and stir?

3 Likes

Get a milk frother one of the best things I’ve brought and you can use it in small mixes as well I got one for about £8

2 Likes

I have looked at them but they look too big for a 10ml bottle. I like to try new recipes using a 10ml bottle and if I like then I’ll make a 100ml. I contemplated making my own wisk using my dremel but I figured I’d have to make a few variations depending on bottle size.

3 Likes

I used one of these before using a homoginizer. Works really well and the thin looking piece fans out once it’s spining making it ideal for use in light openings like juice bottles.
https://www.ebay.com/i/252716720517?chn=ps

4 Likes

Not really a good idea some say. If nicotine is present in the blending process then the millions of air bubbles created by the frother could begin oxidizing the nic. You don’t want that.

3 Likes

@TorturedZen … oxidizing the nic?? Have never heard of this. I use a saws-all contraption I made and get thousands of little bubbles…after the shake with it…so many that it’s cloudy till it settles… I do add the nic to the initial mixture… am I doing this wrong?

2 Likes

When an e-liquid is exposed to oxygen and agitated, oxygen molecules are suspended throughout the liquid. That’s where the milky look comes from. I’m not a chemist but I’m pretty sure the nicotine will begin to break down and lose potency.

A couple of years back I used the frother also until I found out the effects oxygen has on nicotine.
Note: A quick way to get rid of the bubbles is the drop the batch in an ultrasonic cleaner. It will clear up a milky bottle in a matter of minutes.

4 Likes

I saw you comment about this topic on a few different posts and I’m curious to know more, I searched for a specific topic but didn’t find one on the forum. My understanding is the oxygen mixing with liquid in general has potential of turning the liquid a darker color, hence oxidization. The flavors themselves when exposed to light and air tend to go bad faster (not in the sense of expiring, rather the flavor changes which can taste nasty). nic losing its potency is more prone to occur when exposed to light and high temps than it is to oxygen. If there are articles out there please share.

3 Likes

Oxygen is horrible for nicotine …

First, there is a process called nicotine oxidation . Here, oxygen molecules bind to nicotine and break it down into various oxidation products based on how much energy was used to break up the molecule. … When an e-liquid is exposed to oxygen and agitated, oxygen molecules are suspended throughout the liquid.Nov 26, 2016

3 Likes

I know this is true, but does this give us hesitation in shaking our NIC before using it ?

4 Likes

So… if I am understanding this correctly… no using of frothers or hard core shaking??? I’m 100% stumped now… I’ve always done the hard core shaking … but now I’m wondering if I’ve been doing it wrong all this time???

2 Likes

I wouldnt be so worried about the shaking …

4 Likes

Not me…

3 Likes

I never experienced any difference between shaking my mixes and using a mag mixer save your money and acquire a homogenizer .

4 Likes

Oxidation of Nicotine surely will cause a taste issue but the degradation of potency is not a huge problem up until maybe 2 year old juice IMO, and that would be more of a degradation of the flavors before the nicotine. I think some ppl take this oxidation viewpoint to the extreme.

Oxygen Exposure Problems

Exposure to the air has adverse effects on e-liquids of all kinds. Such exposure causes oxidation, a process that begins when air comes in contact with any liquid. The liquids begin to oxidize, which means spoiling and decaying of the e-juice. Although this process generally takes a long period of time to develop, vapers should avoid leaving bottles open for any amount of time unnecessarily. A properly sealed e-liquid bottle or vape cartridge can last well over a year or more, but an opened one should last slightly less than a year in a properly stored environment. Oxidation causes the liquid’s flavor and color to change over time. This is indicated by a darker shade of color in the product tint. There can be a change in odor, but this is less likely to occur in normal storage circumstances.

There are some that think that oxygen exposure causes e-liquid nicotine levels to diminish or drop. There is no evidence to support the idea that oxygen exposure drops or diminishes nicotine content in e-liquids, but overly oxidized products will usually taste bad and should not be used.

So can exposure to oxygen cause nicotine levels in e-liquids to drop? In reality, this isn’t true. Open air exposure causes the flavors to go bad, long before loss of nicotine strength would ever happen. It is exposure to light or high temps that causes nicotine levels to diminish. Even products slightly past their labeled date of expiration should not be harmful or lose their overall potency. Still, the best idea is to always keep your bottles sealed tightly and stored in a cool dark place, but also check their freshness by observing the expiration dates.

It is very common for vapers to become misinformed about products and their usage in the open marketplace. The idea that oxygen exposure causes nicotine levels to drop in e-liquids is one such modern myth, so don’t believe the hype. Do your research will keep your choices well informed as a consumer and self-assured as a buyer, no matter what you are shopping for in the global marketplace.

5 Likes

Good 'ol manual shaking for a minute or 2 is sufficient to get everything blended. We may tend to over-think the process and are often willing to try something (anything?) to cut down on the time and/or effort it takes to arrive at the final product, including the initial mixing phase.

Try whatever methods trip yer trigger. And if one doesn’t work try another. A new mixer will invariably try multiple methods before settling on the one that works consistently for them. There are several avenues just waiting to be explored!

6 Likes

Thank you… :sunglasses:

2 Likes

Milk frother. The business end is halo shaped with a spring to get that froth. With some sturdy pliers (I think I used small Channel Locks) bend the halo and remove the spring. Then bend the halo part into a ball small enough to go into a 30ml Boston Round. Pay attention to achieving some relative balance while spinning (not too offset from center).

I used this for 3 years. Mine goes right down a 30ml PET gorilla bottle (tall and skinny) and there’s no place for the juice to hide. The hole in a 30ml HDPE Gorilla bottle is too small. Forming the end requires some hand strength and a mechanical eye. I was originally trying for a nice spiral but the ball worked great and was easier to achieve …that’s a somewhat thick stainless shaft but it bends. Start at the end with the wire offset so when you squeeze it starts “balling” and work your way around that halo portion. [disclaimer] Destroy your frother at your own risk

4 Likes

Very interesting information. Thanks all. I’ve made my own stirrer out of 24g ss I stick in my dremel. Can’t shake too good by hand because I have tendinitis in both elbows. Might end up going the route of a homogenizer.

6 Likes

You won’t be sorry if you go that route, and you will never go back once you do.

5 Likes