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How the Pandemic Will End

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Great article. I hope my countrymen/women speak up to those in power and demand we take the necessary steps to stablize our situation.

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Yeah, it was well written. I’m crossing my fingers that effective treatments are underway as well as effective vaccines!

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here is yet another thought… conspiracy or???

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From referenced article:

It depends, for a start, on making a vaccine. … Last Monday, a possible vaccine created by Moderna and the National Institutes of Health went into early clinical testing. … “Even if it works, they don’t have an easy way to manufacture it at a massive scale,” said Seth Berkley of Gavi. … No matter which strategy is faster, Berkley and others estimate that it will take 12 to 18 months to develop a proven vaccine, and then longer still to make it, ship it, and inject it into people’s arms.

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Some meaningful observations about meaningless ceremonial “vigilances” (referenced in main article):

… a dramatic disconnect between our imagined effectiveness and the reality of our lives. Many Americans learned to see individual indulgence as a noble fulfillment of patriotic duty, all while conducting the longest armed conflict in our history and succumbing to the kind of us-versus-them Islamophobia the terrorists wanted - more, I suspect, than they wanted Americans to avoid malls. We submitted to needless security theater, sacrificed our privacy to the Patriot Act, and spent uncountable sums on an unwinnable war. We are all more surveilled, more vulnerable, more precarious, and less free. But we can sure shop and eat at restaurants and tell ourselves it’s for the good of the country. We have been led to believe that consumerism is the only political power we, the people, really have. American troops may still be abroad, but this is how we at home win the “battles” that have become notional and emptied of any ideal but rationalized selfishness. There’s no risk. There’s no sacrifice. The lesson the war on terror taught was that doing and buying exactly what we want is sticking a boot in the enemy’s ass. That’s a really weird lesson, not least because of the way it recasts activities Americans tend to regard as feminine and frivolous, like shopping, as a kind of masculine badassery. That’s the type of tension that leads to overcompensation; no wonder some Americans are all the more determined to prove their mettle in contexts where it makes no sense. Real courage and real patriotism call for an entirely different approach.

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LOL obviously :stuck_out_tongue:

When two or more people communicate regarding (any particular) potential action, that is a “conspiracy”

Good article. Hope leaders will listen doctors, experts and scientists more before it’s too late.

Yeah. Usually it means to plot (something wrong, evil, or illegal). In this case it’s more like religious wacky Alex Jones tinfoil hat conspiracy stuff :rofl:

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Speaking of unworthy deeds, acting to wantonly waste intelligent people’s time is itself a “conspiracy”.

“Night of the Living Regurgitators” - American Carnage, coming soon to a public animal farm near you.

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I remember being horrified by 9/11, as we all were. I was just as horrified when the abrogation of the rights of citizens began. The suspension of Habeas Corpus was a watershed event that portended a change that would not easily be overturned. I vowed to not return to the US until the Patriot Act was finished. Unfortunately, the government’s will has outlasted mine, as it will for all of us. It’s fucking depressing to have watched the US from afar over the last 20 years. Just my experience and views, people.

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