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Alien Chicken

I cook dinner every day for the family and I have been cooking since I was a little kid and lately I have noticed something I find very strange when it comes to cooking chicken and I would guess that I first noticed this about a month ago. anyway, I have found that every chicken I cook lately whether its a whole chicken or just chicken parts like legs and thighs have a LOT LOT LOT of juice. yesterday I cooked a 4-pound chicken in the air fryer and when it was done cooking there were 4 cups of broth at the bottom of the pan. now, I know that after freezing and then thawing there could be more juice because of that but this wasn’t that.

i let it rest for 8 min or so and another 1/2 cup came out. when I stuck my thermometer into the chicken it burst forth juice and hit me in the face. point being, “darn that’s a lot of juice”

has anybody else noticed this or anything different with your food? I’m, curious is all.

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Not really, here…
I bought chicken, eh 90lbs off a food truck before the corona hit… maybe a 1/3 of the way thru it now…
tender moist and juicy, but nothing like how you are describing yours, Dan… but chicken stock is a good thing… freeze it for dumplings, stuffing and other recipe usages :slight_smile:

I wish mine did that!

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The manufacturers inject water to the meat and the so called reason for that is to make the meat taste better.

If you ask me it is to make the meat weigh more to be able to earn more.

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Those are Chikonians introduced by the planet Zarcon. The extra juice is a drug that will make humans eat less mushrooms. The Zarconians are coming soon to harvest all of our mushrooms.

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Now if they could find a way to do that with beer…

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I miss the post smiles :innocent: :nerd_face: :nerd_face:

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My last few packs of chicken breasts have been much juicier than usual. It is just water and I don’t believe for one minute they do that for our benefit but they are very tender to eat. However I can’t taste any benefit.

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My mind went straight to the gutter. LOL…I’ll never look at carving a chicken quite same now. :thinking:

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I know a good therapist if you need it. Cured me of having ill thoughts about watermelon. :rofl:

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I’m right there beside you TZ. :flushed:

And Smoky’s

:+1: :rofl:

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OOopsies!! :nerd_face: :innocent: :face_with_monocle: :crazy_face:

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Spot on bro, they do that here. You lose the water after cooking and have not much chicken left.
Crooks :frowning_face:

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A man after my own heart. :wink:

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OMG, I needed that. I was laughing all the way through the thread. Gotta love it.

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Lol regarding comment about how they add water it definitely is for weight. I work at a Bacon & Sausage factory for example where my Dad works in a managerial position and one day he explained to me that theres no money in bacon the money is in the water they can pump into it… food for thought!

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Wow, so it’s been going on for years but all of a sudden they are pumping a lot more into them eh?

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I guess so! He also said their most expensive product is the one with the most water in it so I wonder if that’s the same with chicken ect

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it must be. that is the only thing that makes sense. to bad I live in town. just one more mile and I could have had chicken on my land and a cow and a pig too. the only problem with that is I hate killing my own food but not so much I wouldn’t do it to save money and not get ripped off by unscrupulous fowl raisers.

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Even though I live in a Midwest farm town, there are certain animals not allowed within city limits. Someone in my neighborhood had chickens for awhile until someone must have turned them in or they eventually ate them. Now that I think about it, I really miss hearing that cock crow every morning…

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I raise chickens, for eggs and occasionally meat. raising them right I am afraid you would not save money doing it on a small scale. Average prices for whole broiler/fryer in the US is around $1.60 lb in the retail market. Buy one locale farm raised even here in WV where there a plenty of home flocks and you pay about $5.00 lb ( https://www.bls.gov/regions/mid-atlantic/data/averageretailfoodandenergyprices_usandsouth_table.htm ). But you would definitely find a different product on your table that is for sure.

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