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First attempt NET

Hello, well thanks to the forum experts, I just put this tobacco, 30 gr. and 150ml. of PG. I will leave it 8 hours at 55 degrees Celsius, and then 30 days of maceration.
Just to ensure, the result is at 0 nicotine, right?
Thanks to all those who collaborate in the forum selflessly, and remember that if you visit Barcelona, I invite you to a beer.
Sorry for my bad English.




In a month I will tell you how it has been …

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Yep, or maybe very close to 0. Nice one, looking forward to your update a month from now :grin:

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Thanks for interested

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Have not really paid much attention to NET topics so I have to assume that thingamajig in the pic is a Sous Vide. I think there’s another thread about it somewhere else here also. Maybe it was yours but I’ll look later. What has been your experience using it as steeping method?

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Yay! :hugs: @Gus6 … I hope your first run turns out splendid.

Words from one who has made mistakes:

Don’t throw away the tobacco after you strain the maceration. Sometimes 30 days isn’t quite enough cool steep time for some tobaccos.

However, some of my favorite extractions are macerations at 30 days. It’s a hit or miss; tobacco leaf is mysterious that way. Thus, if you feel the extract isn’t quite as concentrated as you’d like, you can pitch the tobacco back into the extract jar and let it sit for a bit longer. :wink:

Good luck!

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ok thank you, so I will

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OHHH, lol, think I need to get filtering the 12 jars of different blends. Reminded me still vaping on some of yours excellent stuffIMG_0840

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You’ve done yourself a favor (and the leaf justice) leaving that cigar leaf in the jar for months on end. Many have come to the conclusion that cigar leaf needs an extended cool steep time, if your maceration process doesn’t include some type of ultrasonic help.

@50YearsOfCigars has great success with using an unltrasonic maceration method with his single leaf varietals from Leaf Only. :sunglasses: But, even then, I believe he allows the maceration to mature for months prior to filtering.

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V[quote=“Kinnikinnick, post:9, topic:221057”]
even then, I believe he allows the maceration to mature for months prior to filtering.
[/quote]

Yep, “time in a bottle”

Actually, if @Kinnikinnick did not have me so backed up currently testing a group of VaPers that he generously sent me last week I would otherwise now have time to be taking care of the necessary chores of pulling samples from the following list of Pure Leafs that @anon13011326 also generously sent me back in July. For sure, It is time to give them a sample test. They might need a few more months, but you don’t know till you test them.

( *WARNING: Troll Alert Follows !! .) For the lurkers out there, (you know who you are, :grinning: ) that are reading this, you are getting a glimpse of something that is part and parcel of the process of making NETs. It is a feature of a long and careful process, very different from just ordering a few mls of the latest industrial chemicals that are parceled out from a 55 gallon drum. Making NETs is much closer to the hobbies of amateur wine making or amateur beer making. It requires skill and experience. In contrast to simply mixing up synth concoctions from a recipe.

Here’s the @anon13011326 list that is waiting for attention:

  • Batch#-1-18 Leaf - 7/10/2018
    Nicaraguan Seco Jalapa
  • Batch#-2- 18 Leaf - 7/10/2018
    Paraguayan Ligero Filler
  • Batch#-3-18 Leaf - 7/10/2018
    Indonesian Sumatra Seco
  • Batch#-4-18 Leaf - 7/10/2018
    Dominican Seco Criollo 98

For a home movie of the process of “sampling” of these aging NETs here is link. In the movie you can see that, some begin to reveal their potential in just a few days, but then, after we identify the ones with “potential”, then the long process begins. Like I say, it is a lot like wine making…

sampleing

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There was a time when making NET, I felt like the unfortunate soul shoveling elephant shit at the circus, attempting to perform brain surgery. :rofl: However, with every extraction process, trial and error was my teacher. With practice and patience, the process gets less daunting. After a while, it’s like falling off a log! :hugs:

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First, sorry for my bad expression, I use google translator …
After my first NET attempt, with pipe tobacco, according to the beginning of the post, doubts and reflections during the wait:

  • Is there much difference between starting 6-8 hours at 50-55 ºC (thanks @Kinnikinnick reading you I dared with this, and thanks to others too), and not doing it, simply mixing tobacco with PG? Does only the mash time vary or does the flavor vary? I’ll make a trial batch …
  • The tobacco I used, is ready to smoke in a pipe, this means that it is “quite” wet. Should it be allowed to dry before putting PG?
  • And finally, I know that this category is for NET, but I thought of waiting for NET. Has anyone tried to macerate dried (dehydrated) fruit with PG? Could it be a valid path? It occurs to me that any well-dehydrated fruit could work …
    With my bad English, I have not found the thread on this subject, I seem to have read something, but I can not find it … I think I remember some comments about the oils that can be generated when macerating, but I think that decanting the mixture can be separated without problem…

Until now, this is all. Thanks in advance to everyone for the comments and for the help they offer.

Remember that if you visit Barcelona, ​​I invite you to a beer …

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Sorry for the delay @TorturedZen , I have not used the sous vide to macerate liquids, just for cooking and now for NET, but I’ve read comments in both senses: it speeds up the process and it’s not worth it … Someday I’ll try … At the moment I consider myself a novice, I am learning to mix …

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–>>Is there much difference between starting 6-8 hours at 50-55 ºC (thanks @Kinnikinnick reading you I dared with this, and thanks to others too), and not doing it, simply mixing tobacco with PG? Does only the mash time vary or does the flavor vary? I’ll make a trial batch …

The pre-heating helps to shorted the mash time. The flavor should be the same if the time is left long enough for both ways of proceeding. Be very carful not to allow the temp over 125F

–>>The tobacco I used, is ready to smoke in a pipe, this means that it is “quite” wet. Should it be allowed to dry before putting PG?

You would be well advised to dry the tobacco as much as possible. Do not use heat or forced air method just spread out on a tray in warm part of the house for a day or two. Unfortunately some inexpensive shop tobacco is moistened with artificial humectants, and tobacco like that should be avoided for maceration and extractions.

–>>And finally, I know that this category is for NET, but I thought of waiting for NET. Has anyone tried to macerate dried (dehydrated) fruit with PG? Could it be a valid path? It occurs to me that any well-dehydrated fruit could work …

It would seem that this is possible. i have never tried fruits. However I have worked with coffee and had very good results.

–>>With my bad English, I have not found the thread on this subject, I seem to have read something, but I can not find it … I think I remember some comments about the oils that can be generated when macerating, but I think that decanting the mixture can be separated without problem…

The discussions about oils have not been accurate and have many technical problems with the expertise of the authors of those articles. Just ignore the subject. For your purposes of extraction from known good natural tobacco samples that are otherwise safe for combustion smoking you will be very safe with the extractions made from those samples.

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Thanks for the answers, sir

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Don’t doubt yourself too much. :wink: I’m sure everything will turn out fine.

I agree with @50YearsOfCigars on this… But, will add… With most heat assisted tobacco macerations, after about 30 days of cool steep time, you’re possibly good to go. The flavor just deepens a bit if you leave it cool steeping for longer periods. Be careful with Latakia blends… very low heat should be used for a much shorter period of time (or not at all). Upon cool steeping, I would check the potency of the extraction at 30 days to see how it has progressed in strength.

@50YearsOfCigars and I kinda split on this issue… the “drying factor”. I would hazard a guess (actually read in articles) that the humectant used on most pipe tobaccos is plain old PG. Since most of my macerations are PG anyway… I just dump PG straight on to the already moist tobacco. I’ve never gone through a tobacco drying process first. Your mileage may vary.

I have not. But, would caution you about vaping such an extract… more research would be in order. :grimacing:

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Well actually don’t be too quick with the thanks … @Kinnikinnick has pointed out many problems with my quick shoot from the hip response. Tomorrow I’ll make another follow on post and try and expand my answers so that they’ll be a lot more accurate and complete.

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Nah… it isn’t that there are problems… just slightly different points of view on certain issues concerning extracting flavor from tobacco. A problem would be if you literally boiled the tobacco in H2O at 350* F for 16 hours. :rofl:

Who knows… in his process, @Gus6 may land on a new technique which suits his needs perfectly. :grinning: It’s all about finding exactly what’s right for you, but, being open minded to the suggestions of others.

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Small update
Well I have not been able to wait … I have “stolen” 15 drops of macerated and I have mixed them with 85 drops 50/50 … this promises … To anyone who likes the flavors of tobacco, I recommend researching in NET … Thanks to the experts, sincerely, thanks…

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